Tuesday, January 27, 2009

richard allen lvs mick ronson



LF 13723 .


Formed in a dreary suburb of Manchester in 1976 and billed support to the Sex Pistols at a gig in the Lesser Free Trade Hall in that same year (The Buzzcocks also made an impromptu appearance), Slaughter & The Dogs were the missing link between the Glitter Band, football terraces and punk. Their first 45, "Cranked Up Really High b/w The Bitch" was released in May, 1977 on Rabid Records - not to be confused with the significantly younger and trendier Swedish label - also the original home to sterling performance poet, John Cooper Clarke, with his Curious Yellows. And the Nosebleeds.

The follow-up was released on Decca as a 12", and of course I was among those intellectually challenged fresh-faced upstarts who rushed along to my local independent record shop to purchase a copy. Not clever, no, but good fun all the same. After a fashion. It all depends on how inebriated or sickly tense you are.

Wayne Barrett: vocals; Mike Rossi: guitar;
Howard 'Zip' Bates: bass; Brian 'The Mad Muffet' Grantham: drums.

Produced by Nick Tauber; engineered by Adrian Martin.

Rumour has it that Wayne Barrett later became a successful used car salesman, although this development is possibly apocryphal.

A rather silly piece of rabid nostalgia.

SLAUGHTER & THE DOGS: WHERE HAVE ALL THE BOOT BOYS GONE ? from "Where Have All The Boot Boys Gone ? b/w You're A Bore" 12" 45 (Decca) 1977 (UK)


SLAUGHTER & THE DOGS OFFICIAL SITE

PURCHASE THE COMPLETE RICHARD ALLEN: SKINHEAD TRILOGY

8 comments:

Mike B in NYC said...

But our silly pieces of rabid nostalgia may be the only way to convince our offspring that we were once as short-sighted as they currently are.

Thanks for all your fine work here. Your blog (and your brethren at AD) are daily remainders of what's important - and it ain't just music...

ib said...

Thanks for the comment, Mike B.

Having been accused lately by my onetime nearest and dearest of investing my time and energies in "shite", your words of validation are most appreciated. Cheers!

ib said...

Of course. If I'd been insensitive enough to remark in a similar vein on her weekday arts class, I'd have been castigated as an arch bastard out to destroy her self-esteem.

I digress...

Mr. Beer N. Hockey said...

Big fans of the Dogs we are here. They nailed the punk rock groove on Boot Boys that's for certain. Some might argue punk rock was nothing more than another expression of the grim crews who lurked on the terraces, the streets and other smelly places in the mid-seventies. Good times...

Löst Jimmy said...

A fine reminder here ib, I remember the 'Dogs well, well who could forget such a song title!?

ib said...

"...grim crews who lurked on the terraces, the streets and other smelly places in the mid-seventies."

Definitely. Three button pinstripe high-waisters. Levis and Doc Martens. Simon shirts and Fred Perry.

I am glad that women and girls no longer seem to pluck their eyebrows out of all existence.

Brushback said...

Great song. How 'bout some Cock Sparrer?

ib said...

The only Cock Sparrer song I recall being found of, in truth, was their terrace chant version of the Sones' "We Love You"; I liked that a lot.